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Horace 3.1
Odi profanum vulgus et arceo;
favete linguis. carmina non prius
audita Musarum sacerdos
virginibus puerisque canto.
regum timendorum in proprios greges,
reges in ipsos imperium est Iovis,
clari Giganteo triumpho,
cuncta supercilio moventis.
est ut viro vir latius ordinet
arbusta sulcis, hic generosior
descendat in campum petitor,
moribus hic meliorque fama
contendat, illi turba clientium
sit maior; aequa lege Necessitas
sortitur insignes et imos:
omne capax movet urna nomen.
destrictus ensis cui super impia
cervice pendet, non Siculae dapes
dulcem elaborabunt saporem,
non avium citharaeque cantus
somnum reducent. somnus agrestium
lenis virorum non humiles domos
fastidit umbrosamque ripam,
non zephyris agitata Tempe.
desiderantem quod satis est neque
tumultuosum sollicitat mare
nec saevus Arcturi cadentis
impetus aut orientis Haedi,
non verberatae grandine vineae
fundusque mendax, arbore nunc aquas
culpante, nunc torrentia agros
sidera, nunc hiemes iniquas.
contracta pisces aequora sentiunt
iactis in altum molibus: huc frequens
caementa demittit redemptor
cum famulis dominusque terrae
fastidiosus. sed Timor et Minae
scandunt eodem quo dominus, neque
decedit aerata triremi et
post equitem sedet atra Cura.
quodsi dolentem nec Phrygius lapis
nec purpurarum sidere clarior
delenit usus nec Falerna
vitis Achaemeniumque costum,
cur invidendis postibus et novo
sublime ritu moliar atrium?
cur valle permutem Sabina
divitias operosiores?

Comparison: The movie Office Space
Great Movie. Hilarious and has a deep philosophy behind it. It is rate R though so discretion is advised.


Both the movie Office Space and Horace’s Ode 3.1 explore the concept of living life with minimal ambition. In Horace’s Ode 3.1 Horace mentions a “capax…urna” (line 16) to make the point that no matter how many accomplishments are achieved or how ambitious someone is in their lifetime everyone, including the slacking, lazy bum who sleeps and eats all day, is going to end up in the exact same “spacious urn”. Capax is one of those double meaning words that are so prevalent in Latin literature, one meaning being spacious while the other meaning being capable. This spacious, capable urn that Horace is talking about is a metaphor representing Hades. So what Horace is saying is that everyone is going to end up in Hades regardless of ambition/achievements. Peter, the main character of Office Space, has a similar outlook on ambition and achievements. Peter has worked in the same cubicle for the company Initech for five years with the aspirations of earning more money or getting a promotion. Peter has an encounter with a hypno-therapist who “convinces” Peter to relax and to do what he wants to do. Peter then stops trying so hard to succeed (i.e. wears casual clothes, ignores his bosses, etc.). As Peter talks to his friend about his realization he says, “Michael, we don't have a lot of time on this earth! We weren't meant to spend it this way.” Peter is referencing the corporate system and the hoops that it makes people jump through to succeed. Similar to Horace’s philosophy, Peter understand that people do not live forever, so it is better to enjoy the time that he is alive instead of trying to work hard to succeed. Both the ode and the movie share the common theme of making the best out of life by enjoying it and that it is foolish to work hard because it is basically a waster of time.

Horace 1.11
Tu ne quaesieris, scire nefas, quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quicquid erit, pati,
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum: sapias, uina liques, et spatio breui
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit inuida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.


A Little Less Conversation by Elvis Presley
A little less conversation, a little more action please
All this aggravation aint satisfactioning me
A little more bite and a little less bark
A little less fight and a little more spark
Close your mouth and open up your heart and baby satisfy me
Satisfy me baby

Baby close your eyes and listen to the music
Drifting through a summer breeze
Its a groovy night and I can show you how to use it
Come along with me and put your mind at ease

A little less conversation, a little more action please
All this aggravation aint satisfactioning me
A little more bite and a little less bark
A little less fight and a little more spark
Close your mouth and open up your heart and baby satisfy me
Satisfy me baby

Come on baby Im tired of talking
Grab your coat and lets start walking
Come on, come on
Come on, come on
Come on, come on
Don't procrastinate, don't articulate
Girl it's getting late, gettin upset waitin around

A little less conversation, a little more action please
All this aggravation aint satisfactioning me
A little more bite and a little less bark
A little less fight and a little more spark
Close your mouth and open up your heart and baby satisfy me
Satisfy me baby


Both Elvis’ song “A Little Less Conversation” and Horace’s Ode 1.11 share a common theme of constant action (hustle and bustle). Elvis' concise statement of "A little less conversation, a little more action baby" mirrors Horace’s more subtle statement of "dum loquimur, fugerit inuida aetas" (while we speak, envious time will have fled). At the start of Ode 1.11, Horace tries to convince Leuconoe not to fuss or fret about the future and then explains that it is important to appreciate the present and live life with substantial value. Elvis may not be commended for his professional vernacular, but he expresses his point similarly to Horace by saying "All this aggravation aint satisfactioning me... Don't procrastinate, don't articulate." Elvis is indirectly saying that he doesn't want to hear aggravation and worrying, he basically just wants to enjoy himself and relish the good parts of life. Elvis and Horace both understand the concept of "seizing the day" and letting destiny take its course. Also, if the theory that Horace was trying to sexually sway Leuconoe is true, then the song and the poem are exact reflections of each other. If the theory were true, then Horace and Elvis would get along indefinitely.

Catullus 30
Alfene immemor atque unanimis false sodalibus,
iam te nil miseret, dure, tui dulcis amiculi?
Iam me prodere, iam non dubitas fallere, perfide?
Ned facta impia fallacum hominum caelicolis placent.
Quae tu neglegis ac me miserum deseris in malis.
Eheu quid faciant, dic, homines cuive habeant fidem?
Certe tute iubebas animam tradere, inique, me
inducens in amorem, quasi tuta omnia mi forent.
Idem nunc retrahis te ac tua dicta omnia factaque
ventos irrita ferre ac nebulas aereas sinis.
Si tu oblitus es, at di meminerunt, meminit Fides,
quae te ut paeniteat postmodo facti faciet tui.

external image michelangelo-sistine_chapel.jpg
(Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo)

There are numerous similarities between the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo and Catullus' Poem 30. Both Catullus’ Poem 30 and the Sistine Chapel depict a common theme of betrayal; particularly the history behind the Sistine Chapel. Michelangelo was invited to Rome by Pope Julius II in order to build a tomb for him. However, while in Rome Michelangelo was forced into performing various other tasks. Although Michelangelo was a sculptor, he was obliged to fresco the Sistine Chapel on the ceiling, which was a very difficult task for him (a task difficult for anyone). Michelangelo agonizingly worked on this masterpiece for four straight years. He was constantly rushed, almost completely lost his eyesight, and almost died of malnutrition from being overworked. Similar to the way that Michelangelo was betrayed, Catullus was betrayed in the same city. In Poem 30 Catullus explains that the wicked Alfenus has betrayed him. Catullus almost admits to an admirable relationship with Alfenus when Catullus says, “enticing me in love, as if everything would be safe for me.” Catullus must have trusted Alfenus in order to have been betrayed by him, just as Michelangelo trusted the Pope. Earlier in the poem Catullus asks, “now do you not hesitate to betray me… deceitful one?” Catullus doesn’t mention exactly what Alfenus did to betray him, but it seems as though it was unforeseen or else Catullus would not have said that Alfenus doesn’t hesitate to betray him. This unknowingness is similar to unsuspecting Michelangelo as he arrived to Rome. Although Michelangelo is not commemorated for his poetry, he wrote various poems regarding his painful experience of his fresco. Something about betrayal must cause people to want to express their pain through poetry.


Catullus 5
Vivamus, mea Lesbia, atque amemus,
rumoresque senum severiorum
omnes unius aestimembus assis!
soles occidere et redire possunt;
nobis, cum seme occidit brevis lux,
nox est perpetua una dormienda do mi basia mille, deinde centum
dein mille altera, dein secunda centum
deinde usque altera mille, deinde centum;
dein, cum milia multa fecerimus, conturbabimus, illa ne sciamus,
aut ne quis malus invidere possit
cum tantum sciat esse basiorum.

How Deep Is Your Love by Bee Gees
I know your eyes in the morning sun
I feel you touch me in the pouring rain
And the moment that you wander far from me
I wanna feel you in my arms again

Then you come to me on a summer breeze
Keep me warm in your love
Then you softly leave
And it's me you need to show
How deep is your love

How deep is your love? how deep is your love?
I really mean to learn
'Cause we're living in a world of fools
Breaking us down
When they all should let us be
We belong to you and me

I believe in you
You know the door to my very soul
You're the light in my deepest darkest hour
You're my saviour when I fall
And you may not think I care for you
When you know down inside that I really do
And it's me you need to show
How deep is your love

How deep is your love? how deep is your love?
I really mean to learn
'Cause we're living in a world of fools
Breaking us down
When they all should let us be
We belong to you and me

Then you come to me on a summer breeze
Keep me warm in your love
Then you softly leave
And it's me you need to show
How deep is your love

How deep is your love? how deep is your love?
I really mean to learn
'Cause we're living in a world of fools
Breaking us down
When they all should let us be
We belong to you and me

How deep is your love? how deep is your love?
I really mean to learn
'Cause we're living in a world of fools
Breaking us down
When they all should let us be
We belong to you and me

How Deep Is Your Love by Bee Gees
(great song, creepy video)


How Deep Is Your Love by Bee Gees instantly reminded me of Catullus' Poem 5, especially the chorus. The phrase,"'Cause we're living in a world of fools breaking us down when they all should let us be," is very similiar to Catullus' statement, let us value all of the rumors of strict old men at one penny. Both Catullus and the Bee Gee brothers disregard people that interfere with their love. Also, the Bee Gees and Catullus both completely hyperbolize their love. Catullus spends three lines demanding kisses from Lesbia, while the Bee Gees mention that their lover(s), "know the door to my very soul." Chances are that Lesbia is not going to give Catullus 3,000 plus kisses or that the Bee Gee's Lover knows the door to their souls. Another similiarity between 'How Deep Is Your Love' and Poem 5 is the contrast between light and dark. Catullus discusses the sun and a brief light preceding "nox est perpetua", meaning everlasting night. The Bee Gees sing, "You're the light in my deepest darkest hour", meaning that when everything is going terribly wrong in life, you are still sensational. There are so many similiarities between 'How Deep Is Your Love' and Poem 5 that perhaps the Bee Gees studied Catullus.


external image hippopotamus-amphibius-05a21021.jpgexternal image great-white-shark-1.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FFOEZh1Lbbg
I truly recommend this video. You will definately be suprised. I know I was.

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