WIKI...

Horace Ode 1.5


Quis multa gracilis te puer in rosa
perfusus liquidis urget odoribus
grato, Pyrrha, sub antro?
cui flavam religas comam

simplex munditiis? Heu quotiens fidem

mutatosque deos flebit et aspera

nigris aequora ventis

emirabitur insolens,

qui nunc te fruitur credulus aurea,

qui semper vacuam, semper amabilem

sperat, nescius aurae

fallacis. Miseri, quibus

intemptata nites. Me tabula sacer

votiva paries indicat uvida

suspensisse potenti

vestimenta maris deo.


Misery Loves Company by Mike Ness featuring Bruce Springsteen


[Mike Ness:]
I used to roam all night long
I lurked the streets late at night
I ain't never comin' home

But loneliness
Is part of the game

And misery loves company, yeah, yeah



[Bruce Springsteen:]
I used to think that I was a king

Fancy cars, fancy clothes and diamond rings

Yeah but happiness it’s a funny thing 

And misery just loves company, yeah



[Mike Ness:]
Don't even try to understand

What goes on inside this man

As a boy I used to dream

'Cause sometimes life ain't what it seems, huh!

Huh!



[Mike Ness:]
We used to dance under moonlight

But then the tears began to fall

And baby that ain't right

'Cause losing you

Was part of the game

And misery loves company 

'Caus fucking up

Was part of the game

And misery loves company, yeah

Yeah!






The themes present in both Horace’s Ode 1.5 and Mike Ness’ song “Misery Loves Company” (performed in tandem with Bruce Springsteen) provide a semiautobiographical reflection on the narrator’s emotional development. Ode 1.5 begins with a sense of hasty, almost frantic, passion. This sense of urgency bears the distinct lustful naïveté that typifies Horace’s definition of inexperienced love. In the first stanza, the words “te” and later “Pyrrha”, both represent a “fiery” and impassioned lover. The lovers gather in “love cave” (antro grato) at the beginning of the poem, and they proceed to make love among roses (rosa) without a care in the world. In Mike Ness’ song, the initial two verses depict a young man “roam(ing) all night long” who thinks that he is the “king”. In this way, both narrators express the presumptuous and almost arrogant self-assurance that they once had in romance and in life.

As the two works continue, the tone shifts to a more somber tune as the narrators acknowledge the naivete of their youthful mistakes. Horace’s “slender boy” (gracilis puer) and Ness’ statement “as a boy…” represent the inexperience and foolishness of their young selves. Both pieces shift back and forth from amusing reminiscence to regretful reflection as the piece progresses from stanza to stanza or verse to verse. Eventually, both authors come to realize the blitheness of their youthful behavior. Ness aptly captures the mentality of naive young love in describing it as a “game”.

While Ness’ song lacks the direct presence of a female to objectify the beguiling nature of women that Horace provides with Pyrrha, the ability of youthful relationships to deteriorate and become problematic is implied when Ness states that “losing you was part of the game and misery loves company”. It can be inferred that the misery caused to the narrator resulted from his breakup. In the same way, Horace suggests that his relationship with a girl that was once “golden” (aurea) and “lovely (amabilem) resulted in his life figuratively crashing in a shipwreck. Both narrators saw their superficially perfect worlds come crashing down before them and were forced to adjust their standards of thought and behavior in accordance with the emotional renaissance caused by their first true heartache.









Horace 1.1


Tu ne quaesieris (scire nefas), quem mihi, quem tibi
barley.jpg
Barley...

finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quidquid erit, pati!
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum: sapias, vina liques, et spatio brevi
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit invida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.

Go on and close the curtains
cause all we need is candle light
You and me and a bottle of wine
going to hold you tonight
Well we know I'm going away
and how I wish, I wish it weren't so
So take this wine and drink with me
let's delay our misery

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
wine.jpg
Vinum

Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

There's a log on the fire
and it burns like me for you
Tomorrow comes with one desire
to take me away it's true
It ain't easy to say goodbye
darling please don't start to cry
Cause girl you know I've got to go, oh
Lord I wish it wasn't so

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Tomorrow comes to take me away
I wish that I, that I could stay
Girl you know I've got to go, oh
Lord I wish it wasn't so

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
break_of_dawn.jpg
The break of dawn

Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
and fight the break of dawn
Come tomorrow
tomorrow I'll be gone
tomorrow I'll be gone
tomorrow I'll be gone
tomorrow I'll be gone
tomorrow I'll be gone

Save tonight
Save tonight
Save tonight
Save tonight

- "Save Tonight" by Eagle-Eye Cherry


Horace's Ode 1.11 bears a distinctive tone. Emblematic of latin poetry and even the language in general, Horace's Ode 1.11 is ripe with meaning and symbolism that is often overlooked by the more casual reader. The overt theme of spontaneity and "living in the moment" is clear in both pieces. Horace exhorts Leuconoe to "vina liques, spatio brevi", or in English, "mix the wine, because time is short". While Horace's attitude can be viewed as simply amiable and philosophical, the references to alcohol consumption connote a certain lust that belies the undercurrents of sexuality woven into the fabric of Horace's verse. In a line that bears striking resemblance to Horace's words, Eagle-Eye Cherry juxtaposes the innocent notion simple philosophical advice with the sexual intonations of an attempt at seduction in saying, "so take this wine and drink with me/ let's delay our misery". Eagle-Eye Cherry's statement invokes the familiar concept of the brevity of human existence that Horace also developed and also mirrors the subtle urgency of romance. The romantic pleas made by both artists do little to mask the overbearing sadness inherent in both of the two pieces. Horace's recurrent usage of negative words such as "pati", meaning suffer, and "hiemes", meaning winter, complement the pessimism of words such as "fight" and "cry" used by Eagle-Eye Cherry. It seems that the authors, despite their attempts at hasty romance and lyrical reflection, seem to look toward the future with "little hope" (minimum credula). Horace's plea for Leuconoe to "limit (her) far-reaching hope" and to "place as little faith in the future as possible" underscores his fear of an unfortunate and miserable future. In the same way, Eagle-Eye Cherry shows that he anticipates nothing but misery in the future by saying, "let's delay our misery" and acting as if he believes his misery is a forgone and inevitable conclusion.


Save Tonight (Acoustic) - Eagle Eye Cherry

Catullus 8

Miser Catulle, desinas ineptire,
et quod vides perisse perditum ducas.
fulsere quondam candidi tibi soles,
cum ventitabas quo puella ducebat
amata nobis quantum amabitur nulla.
ibi illa multa cum iocosa fiebant,
quae tu volebas nec puella nolebat,
fulsere vere candidi tibi soles.
nunc iam illa non vult: tu quoque impotens,noli
nec quae fugit sectare, nec miser vive,
sed obstinata mente perfer, obdura.
vale puella, iam Catullus obdurat,
nec te requiret nec rogabit invitam.
at tu dolebis, cum rogaberis nulla.
scelesta, vae te, quae tibi manet vita?
quis nunc te adibit? cui videberis bella?
quem nunc amabis? cuius esse diceris?
quem basiabis? cui labella mordebis?
at tu, Catulle, destinatus obdura.

Love grows in me like a tumor,
Parasites bent on devouring it's host.
I'm developing my sense of humor,
Till I can laugh at my heart between your teeth,
Till I can laugh at my face beneath your feet.

Skillet on the stove is such a temptation,
Maybe I'll be the lucky one that doesn't get burned.
What the f*ck was I thinking?

Love plows through me like a dozer,
I've got more give than a bale of hay,
And there's always a big mess left over.
What did you do?
What did you say?

Skillet on the stove is such a temptation,
Maybe I'll be the special one that doesn't get burned.
What the f*ck was I thinking?

Love tears me up like a demon.
Opens the wounds and fills them with lead,
And I'm having some trouble just breathing.
If we weren't such good friends I think that I'd hate you.
If we weren't such good friends I'd wish you were dead

Oh it's so embarrassing
I'm this awkward and uncomfortable thing,
And I'm running out of places to hide…

-"F*ck Was I" by Jenny Owen Youngs

The song F*ck Was I by Jenny Owen Youngs is analogous to Catullus 8 because of the similarity in the tone of the two works. Both authors manage convey that the feel they have been wronged, but manage to do so in an entirely self-deprecating way. Catullus’ contradiction is immediately evident. The very first phrase, “miser Catulle, desinas ineptire”, meaning, “poor Catullus, you must stop being silly”, evokes a contradictory image. On one hand, Catullus appeals to the sympathies of his audience in characterizing himself as “poor” or “miserable”, and on the other hand he quickly alters his characterization and call himself “inept” or “silly”. Similarly, Youngs is quick to point out her own flaws and blame herself, repeatedly asking, “what was I thinking?” as if she were somehow inept. Later on in the song however, the accusatory tone of the poem is diverted from herself and directed to the person with whom she had some kind of argument or falling out, is can be inferred from lines like “If we weren't such good friends I think that I'd hate you./ If we weren't such good friends I'd wish you were dead”. Also, both authors express feelings that they were somehow deceived or manipulated by the spouse or partner. Catullus shows these feelings by indicating that he “ventitabas quo puella ducebat” or “went where the girl led”. It seems that Catullus’ judgment was perhaps impaired by his infatuation with his partner and he feels that he was taken advantage of in this state. Youngs also invokes feeling of manipulation, albeit in more graphic terms, when she says “I'm developing my sense of humor,/ Till I can laugh at my heart between your teeth,/ Till I can laugh at my face beneath your feet”. Generally, the two authors seem to employ the same scathing tone in their respective castigation of themselves and their indecent partners.

WARNING: EXPLICIT CONTENT


Fuck Was I - Jenny Owen Youngs

Catullus 45

Acmen Septimius suos amores
tenens in gremio 'mea' inquit 'Acme,
ni te perdite amo atque amare porro
omnes sum assidue paratus annos,
quantum qui pote plurimum perire,
solus in Libya Indiaque tosta
caesio veniam obvius leoni.'
hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
at Acme leviter caput reflectens
et dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos
illo purpureo ore suaviata,
'sic' inquit 'mea vita Septimille,
huic uni domino usque serviamus,
ut multo mihi maior acriorque
ignis mollibus ardet in medullis.'
hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
nunc ab auspicio bono profecti
mutuis animis amant amantur.
unam Septimius misellus Acmen
mavult quam Syrias Britanniasque:
uno in Septimio fidelis Acme
facit delicias libidinisque.
quis ullos homines beatiores
vidit, quis Venerem auspicatiorem?


Oh I, I just died in your arms tonight
It must have been something you said
I just died in your arms tonight

I keep looking for something I can't get
Broken hearts lie all around me
And I don't see an easy way to get out of this
Her diary it sits on the bedside table
The curtains are closed, the cats in the cradle
Who would've thought that a boy like me could come to this

Oh , I just died in your arms tonight
It must've been something you said
I just died in your arms tonight
Oh I, I just died in your arms tonight
It must've been some kind of kiss
I should have walked away, I should have walked away

Is there any just cause for feeling like this?
On the surface I'm a name on a list
I try to be discreet, but then blow it again
I've lost and found, it's my final mistake
She's loving by proxy, no give and all take
'cos I've been thrilled to fantasy one too many times

Oh , I just died in your arms tonight
It must've been something you said
I just died in your arms tonight
Oh I, I just died in your arms tonight
It must HAVE been some kind of kiss
I should have walked away, I should have walked away

It was a long hot night
She made it easy, she made it feel right
But now it's over the moment has gone
I followed my hands not my head, I knew I was wrong

Oh i, i just died in your arms tonight it must have been something you said, i just died in your arms tonight
i, i just died in your arms tonight it must have been some kind of kiss
i should have walked away, i should have
walked away

-"I Just Died in Your Arms Tonight" by Cutting Crew



Cutting Crew's 1986 classic, "I Just Died In Your Arms Tonight" echoes nearly all of the predominant themes of Catullus' poetry and almost perfectly encapsulates Catullus 45. Both artists invoke the sinister sobriety of death when the rest of the piece suggests happiness. Each of the two works contains numerous and nearly hyperbolic references to kissing that verge in either case on sarcasm, and both works incorporate parallel perceptions of intimacy with the phrases "in gremio" and "in your arms". The underlying passion in the two pieces is evident, but the image of love is tainted by the invocation of death. The narrator of both pieces seems to combat a preoccupation with self-image. Passion manifests itself in such lines as "ignis mollibus ardet in medullis" and "it was a long hot night". Fire provides a particularly appropriate metaphor for the passion of love because of its unique ability to both inspire ineffable beauty and to wreak incomprehensible damage. Cutting Crew's song acts almost as a sequel to Catullus 45 that both mirrors and builds upon the somber tone employed by Catullus. While the ultimate result in Catullus' poem seems to be harmonious and peaceful, the inherent ability of love to catalyze death is mentioned even when the facade of love is most real in Catullus' mind, perhaps suggesting that love invariably leads to pain and, further, death. The Cutting Crew song has an outcome in accordance with the one that Catullus mentioned when he wrote the lines "quantum qui pote plurimum perire, /solus in Libya Indiaque tosta /caesio veniam obvius leoni", suggesting that an alternative to love is death. The chorus of "I Just Died In Your Arms Tonight" seems to suggest that the narrator figuratively "dies" when his romance turns sour.

Super Duper Quotations
One man with courage makes a majority.
-Andrew Jackson
7th President of the United States (1767 - 1845)

One should always play fairly when one has the winning cards.
-Oscar Wilde
Irish dramatist, novelist, & poet (1854 - 1900)

A hero is no braver than an ordinary man, but he is braver five minutes longer.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Make the most of yourself, for that is all there is of you.
-Ralph Waldo Emerson
US essayist & poet (1803 - 1882)

Incredibly Helpful Links
http://www.outdooralabama.com/watchable-wildlife/what/Birds/pigeons/
http://oddee.com/
http://www.moillusions.com/
http://www.geocities.com/wedontservetheirkindhere/wordsA.htm
http://www.johngoddard.info/life_list.htm
http://funnyexamanswers.com/most-popular-answers/

Below are some pictures that represent my innermost feelings.
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