Horace Ode 3.1
Odi profanum vulgus et arceo;
favete linguis. carmina non prius
audita Musarum sacerdos
virginibus puerisque canto.
regum timendorum in proprios greges,
reges in ipsos imperium est Iovis,
clari Giganteo triumpho,
cuncta supercilio moventis.
est ut viro vir latius ordinet
arbusta sulcis, hic generosior
descendat in campum petitor,
moribus hic meliorque fama
contendat, illi turba clientium
sit maior; aequa lege Necessitas
sortitur insignes et imos:
omne capax movet urna nomen.
destrictus ensis cui super impia
cervice pendet, non Siculae dapes
dulcem elaborabunt saporem,
non avium citharaeque cantus
somnum reducent. somnus agrestium
lenis virorum non humiles domos
fastidit umbrosamque ripam,
non zephyris agitata Tempe.
desiderantem quod satis est neque
tumultuosum sollicitat mare
nec saevus Arcturi cadentis
impetus aut orientis Haedi,
non verberatae grandine vineae
fundusque mendax, arbore nunc aquas
culpante, nunc torrentia agros
sidera, nunc hiemes iniquas.
contracta pisces aequora sentiunt
iactis in altum molibus: huc frequens
caementa demittit redemptor
cum famulis dominusque terrae
fastidiosus. sed Timor et Minae
scandunt eodem quo dominus, neque
decedit aerata triremi et
post equitem sedet atra Cura.
quodsi dolentem nec Phrygius lapis
nec purpurarum sidere clarior
delenit usus nec Falerna
vitis Achaemeniumque costum,
cur invidendis postibus et novo
sublime ritu moliar atrium?
cur valle permutem Sabina
divitias operosiores?

Song of Comparison: Paranoid Android- Radiohead
Please could you stop the noise, I'm trying to get some rest
From all the unborn chicken voices in my head
What's this? (I may be paranoid, but not an android)
What's this? (I may be paranoid, but not an android)

When I am king, you will be first against the wall
with your opinion which is of no consequence at all
What's this? (I may be paranoid, but no android)
What's this? (I may be paranoid, but no android)

Ambition makes you look pretty ugly
Kicking, squealing, gucci little piggy
You don't remember
You don't remember
Why don't you remember my name?
Off with his head, man
Off with his head, man
Why don't you remember my name? I guess he does...

Rain down, rain down
Come on rain down on me
From a great height
From a great height... height...
Rain down, rain down
Come on rain down on me
From a great height
From a great height... height...
Rain down, rain down
Come on rain down on me

That's it sir
You're leaving
The crackle of pigskin
The dust and the screaming
The yuppies networking
The panic, the vomit
The panic, the vomit
God loves his children, God loves his children, yeah!




How it relates?

This epic song "Paranoid Android" by one of my favorite contemporary bands Radiohead appears to resemble Horace' Ode 3.1. However, the video for this song, equally as epic, oozes with Horace' ideals and philosophies, especially those found in Ode 3.1. Ode 3.1 specifically stresses Horace' dislike towards personal ambition and that instead of seeking power and materialistic possessions, people should be content with what they have. The lines, "When I am king, you will be first against the wall," closely resemble Horace' lines, "Regum timendorum in proprios greges," translated as, "The power of the kings who must be feared is over one's crowd," The lyrics of the song give the idea that whoever this person is, has great ambition to become a king seemingly only to have authority over others. Likewise in Horace' ode, men who become kings are very ambitious obviously, but he also includes the, "...who must be feared," suggesting that kings become kings to exercise authority over others. This idea of being ambitious for authority is also expressed in the video with the politicians crowding over a round table seemingly voting on an important decision, hence the sweat and desperate cries of the man who tries to get noticed. This part of the video also resembles Horace' lines, "Reges in ipsos imperium est Iovis," translated as, "The power of Jupiter is over the kings themselves," meaning that no matter how high on the scale of authority that you rank, someone will always have authority over you, in this case Jupiter. In the video however, the ambitious politician who does not get noticed, or rather intentionally overlooked, represents the kings whom driven by ambition to become kings, are inevitably made powerless by Jupiter's authority over them.
A repetitive image in the video is that of a drunken man seemingly wasting his life away at the bottom of society. Not surprisingly, according to Horace, the final scene shows the ambitious, powerful, and successful politician wrapped up like a baby in a tree. Having gruesomely severed his own limbs trying to help or practice his authority over another, which ever way it may be perceived, inevitably ends up in a worse position than the common image of the drunken man who still has his limbs at least! This closely resembles Horace' idea that in the long run, whatever power or wealth one has is pointless because he will inevitably end up in the same place as someone who is powerless and at the bottom of society. Another part of the movie that closely resembles Horace' philosophies from 3.1 is how the young and hopelessly depressed man who indulges in spending money to make him self happy, such as paying the woman to see her naked and buying the fish at the pet store, discovers, with the help of an angel, that he can be happy and entertained by simple things in life such as playing ping pong. This idea is similar to Horace' idea that people should be content with their situation including what they have and can be quite happy with just the necessities in life.


Ode 1.11
Tu ne quaesieris (scire nefas) quem mihi, quem tibi
finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios
temptaris numeros. ut melius, quicquid erit, pati,
seu pluris hiemes seu tribuit Iuppiter ultimam,
quae nunc oppositis debilitat pumicibus mare
Tyrrhenum: sapias, uina liques, et spatio breui
spem longam reseces. dum loquimur, fugerit inuida
aetas: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero

Lyrics: "Bright side of life"-Monty Python

Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse.
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best...


And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...


If life seems jolly rotten
There's something you've forgotten
And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
When you're feeling in the dumps
Don't be silly chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle - that's the thing.


And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life...


For life is quite absurd
And death's the final word
You must always face the curtain with a bow.
Forget about your sin - give the audience a grin
Enjoy it - it's your last chance anyhow.


So always look on the bright side of death
Just before you draw your terminal breath


Life's a piece of shit
When you look at it
Life's a laugh and death's a joke, it's true.
You'll see it's all a show
Keep 'em laughing as you go
Just remember that the last laugh is on you.


And always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the right side of life...
(Come on guys, cheer up!)
Always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the bright side of life...
(Worse things happen at sea, you know.)
Always look on the bright side of life...
(I mean - what have you got to lose?)
(You know, you come from nothing - you're going back to nothing.
What have you lost? Nothing!)
Always look on the right side of life...

How does it relate?
The ending scene of Monty Python's The Life of Brian encourages similar philosophies as Horace’s Ode 1.11. In this scene the main character, Brian, has accidentally managed to get himself crucified and can’t help but think of his inevitable slow and painful death. However, before he drowns himself in sorrow, a fellow crucifixion comrade behind him starts singing,
“Some things in life are bad
They can really make you mad
Other things just make you swear and curse.
When you're chewing on life's gristle
Don't grumble, give a whistle
And this'll help things turn out for the best...
And...always look on the bright side of life...
Always look on the light side of life... “
He is basically dictating one of Horace’s philosophies’s found in Ode 1.11 that advises against thinking too much about all the negative aspects in life and always having a positive attitude towards life. Similarly in Ode 1.11, the lyrics give the tone of a command rather than just simple suggestions, Ode 1.11 opens with “You should not ask (it is a crime to know)…” Another similar philosophy can be found later in the song when he sings,
“If life seems jolly rotten
There's something you've forgotten
And that's to laugh and smile and dance and sing.
When you're feeling in the dumps
Don't be silly chumps
Just purse your lips and whistle - that's the thing”
The singer suggests that despite life seeming worthless at times and death inevitable, you should make an effort to have fun and be happy and endure what ever life brings you, and note the continued used of commands. However, despite Horace’s philosophies and the lyrics and spirit of the song being inspiring ideas, the situation that the characters find themselves in is perhaps not what Horace had in mind when he wrote this poem. Nonetheless, they seem to work pretty well with Brian and his new crucifixion friends.


Catulllus 30
Alfene immemor atque unanimis false sodalibus,
iam te nil miseret, dure, tui dulcis amiculi?
Iam me prodere, iam non dubitas fallere, perfide?
Nec facta impia fallacum hominum caelicolis placent.
Quae tu neglegis ac me miserum deseris in malis.
Eheu quid faciant, dic, homines cuive habeant fidem?
Certe tute iubebas animam tradere, inique, me
inducens in amorem, quasi tuta omnia mi forent.
Idem nunc retrahis te ac tua dicta omnia factaque
ventos irrita ferre ac nebulas aereas sinis.
Si tu oblitus es, at di meminerunt, meminit Fides,
quae te ut paeniteat postmodo facti faciet tui.


How does it relate?
In Poem 30, Catullus explains how he finds Alfenus a distasteful person because he is forgetful, deceitful, and treacherous towards his friends. Catullus holds great value in his friends, especially loyal and honest ones. In the song "Do You Remember Walter" by The Kinks, Ray Davies, the lead singer, sings of an old friend who has lost interest in him and has completely forgotten about him. This gives the idea that who ever this person is, is not a loyal or good friend, at least not anymore. Towards the end of the poem, Catullus makes sure to ridicule Alfenus and sneakily call him a liar by saying that Alfenus allows all of his words and deeds to be carried away by the winds and lofty fogs. Similarly in The Kinks song, Ray Davies says, "Do you remember, Walter, how we said we'd fight the world so we'd be free. We'd save up all our money and we'd buy a boat and sail away to sea. But it was not to be," this shows that who ever his friend was abandoned their plans together and disregarded what he had said. Both Catullus 30 and the song "Do You Remember Walter," have a similar theme of forgetful and deceitful friends and how their actions are not appreciated by Catullus or Ray Davies.



Catullus 45
Acmen Septimius suos amores
tenens in gremio ‘me’' inquit ‘Acme,
ni te perdite amo atque amare porro
omnes sum assidue paratus annos,
quantum qui pote plurimum perire,
solus in Libya Indiaque tosta
caesio veniam obvius leoni.’
Hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
At Acme leviter caput reflectens
et dulcis pueri ebrios ocellos
illo purpureo ore suaviata,
‘sic’ inquit ‘mea vita Septimille,
huic uni domino usque serviamus,
ut multo mihi maior acriorque
ignis mollibus ardet in medullis.’
Hoc ut dixit, Amor sinistra ut ante
dextra sternuit approbationem.
Nunc ab auspicio bono profecti
mutuis animis amant amantur.
Unam Septimius misellus Acmen
mavult quam Syrias Britanniasque:
uno in Septimio fidelis Acme
facit delicias libidinisque.
quis ullos homines beatiores
vidit, quis Venerem auspicatiorem?


How Does it Relate?
One of Catullus' main themes is his intense love for Lesbia. In this poem however, he depicts what would be the perfect relationship, where there is mutual love between the two lovers. In this great Beatles song, And I Love Her, Paul McCartney fundamentally portrays the same message. In lines 3-7 of Catullus 45, Septimius explains to his love Acme that he wants to love her as much as humanly possible and that he is willing to die trying. Similarly, in the Beatles song, Paul opens the song with, "I give her all my love, that's all I do," this coincides with what Septimius says. In lines 13-16 Acme explains how she loves her dear Septimius back, ultimately giving the impression that there is mutual love between Acme and Septimius. The equivalence of this idea is portrayed in the Beatles song, when Paul says, "She gives me ev'rything, and tenderly...A love like ours, could never die," This also has a similar theme to Catullus 5, when Catullus infers that he will love Lesbia for eternity, even long after they have past away. This idea of being ambitious for authority is also expressed in the video with the politicians crowding over a round table seemingly voting on an important decision, hence the sweat and desperate cries of the man who tries to get noticed. This part of the video iis